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Archive for the ‘window-war’ Category

In response to the ghouls who are trying to exploit the mass murder at the political gathering in AZ, blaming the politicians and pundits for the tone of their rhetoric being too combative:

Yes, the quality of political debate is abysmally bad. That is a direct result of how the exercise of political power has more intensely affected the lives of citizens. Voters recognize how all the government programs, laws, regulations, taxes, etc. are dominating their lives and threatening their futures more and more each day, so they are understandably alarmed and getting more desperate to stop the “other side” from taking advantage of them.

“All of this is the predictable result of putting moral questions up to a vote, of rulers making election contests into mock battles, pitting one “side” against another. (Warren mentions the “Coke vs. Pepsi” mentality, which is spot on.)

“Around the 2010 election, I read somewhere [added: here via Beck] that an election is nothing more than two or more armies getting dressed up, marching to the battle field, then counting which side has the most soldiers and awarding the spoils of victory to that side without actually drawing blood. And, as Billy Beck has pointed out for many years: “All politics in this country now is just dress rehearsal for civil war.”

“My solution? Stop voting. Stop giving your permission to politicians to wield power over your neighbors. Work with your neighbors to solve problems via reason and persuasion, instead of resorting to force. Government, by definition, is the use of force.

(My comment here and here.)

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When I first read the “hatriot” section of Bill Clinton’s speech, I told my wife that he was quoting Billy Beck (well, almost). Apparently, Billy didn’t miss that, nor did the many people who sent him e-mail about it.

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A comment at the Walls of the City blog:

I, too have been following Vanderboegh in real time, before his Sipsey Street Irregulars website came into existence, via David Codrea’s War on Guns website (which chronicles daily a dozen or more stories of police corruption, particularly with regards to gun laws–the sheer number of articles itself is a very bad reflection on the state of law enforcement) and the Western Rifle Shooters blog.

Vanderboegh wrote about a fictional Window War a decade or so ago, by his reckoning. It was a cautionary tale about gun control in the twilight of the Clinton administration. His repost occurred Feb 2009, just after Obama’s inauguration, during the uncertainty of a gang of top administration officials who were far more leftist than anyone before in such high office, who brought with them the brazenly corrupt Chicago-style political thuggery. Couple that with the rotten, power-drunk federal law enforcement agencies, who even during the Bush years were already running amok, and anyone paying attention quickly saw the potential for more Waco and Ruby Ridge incidents (which occurred or started during Bush 41, before Clinton upped the stakes with the scary-looking gun ban).

The Window War has been in the works for a long time. Personally, I believe Vanderboegh is a principled man who is not itching for a fight.

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At Walls of the City I comment on this post, which is a roundup of criticisms of Vanderboegh’s Window War:

I wrote a couple posts here and here about your article The Substance of Things, an objectivist critique of Vanderboegh’s Window War. I personally think that such tactics are a miscalculation, which run the risk of “copy cats” escalating the subversive acts to things like cutting propane lines to a house (wrong address, actually) or making death threats. As Vanderboegh himself put it (in reference to a different matter), that’s the Law of Unintended Consequence–you lose control over how things play out. Innocents get hurt. Bad people exploit the chaos to grab power.

My read of history is that civil disobedience–not just waving signs, but actual non-violent lawbreaking–gets much better results. It puts those in power in the position of showing who they really are, highlighting for the “fence sitters” and unaware just what is wrong with forcing people to buy health insurance, for example.

On the other hand, Roberta X’s call “to regroup and plan for elections…for the states to take the matter to court” doesn’t strike me as any more productive than the Window War. You can’t vote yourself into freedom. Elected officials, by their very nature, will never relinquish power once attained, even if it is at the price of your rights. Trying to win a majority is a losing proposition.

Which lead me directly to your claim that “the government has never been the problem with our country.” I could not disagree with you more.

Government was the problem when it ensconced slavery into the Constitution, when it interfered with the free market by imposing a government monopoly on mail delivery (something affecting us this very day), when it made Jim Crow laws, when it engaged in colonialism and foreign interventions (something affecting us this very day), when it imposed one collectivist “reform” or market “regulation” after another. No corporation or non-governmental group has the power of government to trample our rights and to behave unethically (harming the rights of others) purportedly in our name.

Spooner, Garrison, and Thoreau explicated the reasons why the government was wrong, why “its very Constitution is the evil.” Government is aggressive force instead of persuasive reason, which by its very nature is immoral.

Now, while I assert that non-violent civil disobedience will likely get better results now than the Window War, the cartridge box or the ballot box…I do not agree with the notion that violence is never the answer. See this post at The Smallest Minority, or the Solzhenitsyn quote Vanderboegh cites here.

I’ve been reading Vanderboegh for years and I know he has not “been wishing for our backs to be against the wall” nor is he an “extremist… who pleasure[s] [himself] at the thought of another civil war.” I may disagree with him about the usefulness of the Window War (and about God and the Constitution at root), but I do have respect for him as a principled individual, unlike those who cut propane lines, make death threats against legislators’ family members, etc..

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Jacob Sullum at Reason gives us the bad news: Social Security will go negative this year, six years earlier than predicted.

Meanwhile, we start to see the really bad news regarding the consequences of Health Care Deform:

Deere & Co and Caterpillar Inc said they are expecting a combined $250 million in charges this year as a result of changes to the $2.5 trillion U.S. healthcare system that President Barack Obama signed into law this week.

Why do these Democrats act so surprised when the victims start reacting in anger, either symbolically or worse? And, is it any more surprising that the vandalism is directed at both parties?

Now, they’re getting warmed up over Cap-and-Trade (i.e., Kneecap Business and Undermine Free Trade). While they’re scaling back the House version, they’re getting the camel’s nose under the tent. In order to force Americans to limit carbon emissions, it has to hurt, and hurt bad, or people will keep doing what they’re doing. All of this, of course, is based upon bad science. (If James Cameron wants to call anyone “out into the street at high noon and shoot it out”, I’d suggest the weapon to be used be the scientific method of inquiry, which for centuries has necessarily included healthy skepticism in order to move beyond the flat-earth stagnation of “settled” diktats. Mr. Cameron, without any Hollywood glitz, explain feedback and runaway processes in the context of historical data.)

My daughter rolls her eyes when I say, “Want to hear something really scary?” and then proceed to tell her how Social Security will be gone when she retires. She’s not interested now, but this fiscal house of cards that’s starting to teeter is worse than any R-rated slasher movie I won’t let her get at the video store.

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Go listen.

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From Fox News:

Republican Rep. Eric Cantor’s Richmond campaign office was shot at Wednesday night, Fox News has learned, the latest in a rash of apparent threats and acts of intimidation against members of Congress.

Which brings to mind:

“Hold onto your butts!” — Ray Arnold (Samuel L. Jackson) in Jurassic Park (1993)

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